Phil trans r soc lond b-

By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy , Privacy Policy , and our Terms of Service. Academia Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for academics and those enrolled in higher education. It only takes a minute to sign up. I would like to cite journal articles published by the Royal Society , specifically in the journal Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences. A prominent example is the Wikipedia page of the journal , citing amongst others:.

In the latter case, please turn on Javascript support in your web browser and reload this Interactive sex story. Photosynthetic organisms, particularly plants which are essentially sessile, have to constantly deal with changes in a wide range of Phkl and biotic factors Lonf their immediate environment on a seasonal as well as daily basis. It highlights and summarizes the present knowledge from the individual chloroplast reactions to the variation of the adaptive mechanisms in natural populations and on their agricultural and ecological impacts. I wrote to the Royal Society out of curiosity, and received a very helpful answer, along with the permission to post quotes from it here. So here is part 1, referring to Background in the question: The answer to the first part of your question is easy. Embarrassingly for my answer, in this case the two sources disagree, mathscinet subscriber link gives "Philos. To allow for adaptation to a changing environment, natural selection of existing genetic variation takes place. Bertrand et al.

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Spedding, G. Press, Oxford, As long as the abbreviation you use is reasonable and can be recognized by reviewers and editors, you're probably fine. Hawking, S. Here I argue that the adoption of a strictly Jaynesian approach will prevent such errors and will provide us with the philosophical and mathematical framework that is needed to understand the general function of the brain. Zanker, J. BerryHonghe XuHarold D. To obtain the best experience, we recommend you use a more up to date browser or turn Cute sex quotes compatibility mode in Internet Explorer. Chakravarty Acta Mechanica B" while the journal's webpage gives Phil. Osterloff Authors Search for Charles H. B19—44

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Either your web browser doesn't support Javascript or it is currently turned off. In the latter case, please turn on Javascript support in your web browser and reload this page. Light is an essential environmental factor required for photosynthesis, but it also mediates signals to control plant development and growth and induces stress tolerance.

The photosynthetic organelle chloroplast is a key component in the signalling and response network in plants. This theme issue of Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London B: Biology provides updates, highlights and summaries of the most recent findings on chloroplast-initiated signalling cascades and responses to environmental changes, including light and biotic stress.

Besides plant molecular cell biology and physiology, the theme issue includes aspects from the cross-disciplinary fields of environmental adaptation, ecology and agronomy.

Oxygenic photosynthetic organisms carry out the most intriguing reaction on Earth, namely the conversion of light energy from the sun into chemical energy, which also results in oxygen as a by-product. The photosynthetic end products sugars drive most processes in living cells on Earth. As photosynthetic organisms represent the basis of our daily life food, energy, materials , effects on their primary productivity have an impact on the society in various aspects, for instance economy, ecological sustainability and even our lifestyle.

Photosynthetic organisms, particularly plants which are essentially sessile, have to constantly deal with changes in a wide range of abiotic and biotic factors in their immediate environment on a seasonal as well as daily basis. The chloroplast is a light-driven energy factory, but besides this primary mission it perceives signals from surroundings to adjust plant development and induce adaptation to ever-changing environmental cues. The signalling cascades start from various chloroplast processes but merge later or crosstalk with each other and with other signalling cascades figure 1.

For example, acclimation of plants to excess light conditions may also simultaneously increase the tolerance to other abiotic stress factors [ 1 ]. Recently, chloroplasts were also recognized to perceive and mediate signals that promote tolerance against plant pathogens immune defence or that are involved in hormone perception [ 2 ].

Resolving the crosstalk between the cascades is most important for understanding physiological responses in plants under ever-changing environments, and for predicting how plants survive under natural growth conditions. Overview of light-induced chloroplast signalling and response mechanisms, covered by papers in this theme issue. Online version in colour. This theme issue of Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London B: Biology covers the most recent findings and updates on the molecular short-term mechanisms used by the chloroplast to adjust its function to changes in light conditions, and on the signalling pathways that induce long-term adaptive responses, such as stress tolerance and immune defence in plants figure 1.

It focuses on the current understanding of the crosstalk between signalling networks activated by chloroplasts and mitochondria, light receptors and those induced by biotic stress. It also focuses on the variation of the adaptive mechanisms in natural population and on their agricultural and ecological impacts. Thus, besides plant molecular cell biology and physiology, the theme issue includes aspects from the cross-disciplinary fields of environmental adaptation, ecology and agronomy.

It consists of 10 research articles and nine reviews covering the following four topics: i short-term adaptive responses in chloroplasts, ii chloroplast-to-nucleus signalling and crosstalk with other signalling pathways, iii natural variation of regulatory mechanisms to allow for adaptation and iv agricultural and ecological perspective of light responses in chloroplasts.

Light signals perceived by chlorophyll Chl in the thylakoid membrane and by photoreceptors in the cytosol activate various short-term adaptive responses including enzyme regulation, photoprotection and repair figure 1. The paper by Cazzaniga et al. Bertrand et al. Together with adjustments of metabolic processes and induction of photoprotective mechanisms, light initiates signalling to the nucleus for gene expression, resulting in various long-term adaptive responses, including development and growth, stress and programmed cell death figure 1.

Alsharafa et al. ROS signalling is also highlighted in the papers by Heyno et al. Foyer et al. Gorecka et al. Trotta et al. To allow for adaptation to a changing environment, natural selection of existing genetic variation takes place.

Flood, Yin et al. Finally, the review by Darko et al. This research on light-induced signalling and response is developing in many directions, as reflected by the broad field coverage of the papers of this theme issue. It highlights and summarizes the present knowledge from the individual chloroplast reactions to the variation of the adaptive mechanisms in natural populations and on their agricultural and ecological impacts. We thank all the authors who have contributed to this theme issue and the reviewers for their valuable comments and suggestions.

We hope that the readers enjoy the high-quality papers of this theme issue and that these publications inspire the scientists in the field to make new discoveries in future. We thank for support the Swedish Research Council to C. Europe PMC requires Javascript to function effectively. Recent Activity. The snippet could not be located in the article text. This may be because the snippet appears in a figure legend, contains special characters or spans different sections of the article.

PMID: Author information Copyright and License information Disclaimer. All rights reserved. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Abstract Light is an essential environmental factor required for photosynthesis, but it also mediates signals to control plant development and growth and induces stress tolerance. Open in a separate window. Acknowledgements We thank all the authors who have contributed to this theme issue and the reviewers for their valuable comments and suggestions.

References 1. Plastid-to-nucleus communication, signals controlling the running of the plant cell. Acta , — Interactions between hormone and redox signalling pathways in the control of growth and cross tolerance to stress. Short-term acclimation of the photosynthetic electron transfer chain to changing light: a mathematical model.

B , On the origin of a slowly reversible fluorescence decay component in the Arabidopsis npq4 mutant. Ruban AV, Belgio E. The relationship between maximum tolerated light intensity and photoprotective energy dissipation in the photosynthetic antenna: chloroplast gains and losses.

Relaxation of the non-photochemical chlorophyll fluorescence quenching in diatoms: kinetics, components and mechanisms. Thioredoxin-dependent regulatory networks in chloroplasts under fluctuating light conditions.

Kirchhoff H. Structural changes of the thylakoid membrane network induced by high light stress in plant chloroplasts.

Larkin RM. Influence of plastids on light signalling and development. Interaction between plastid and mitochondrial retrograde signalling pathways during changes to plastid redox status. Kinetics of retrograde signalling initiation in the high light response of Arabidopsis thaliana. Light-harvesting mutants show differential gene expression upon shift to high light as a consequence of photosynthetic redox and reactive oxygen species metabolism. Abscisic acid signalling determines susceptibility of bundle sheath cells to photoinhibition in high light-exposed Arabidopsis leaves.

Signalling crosstalk in light stress and immune reactions in plants. Natural variation in phosphorylation of photosystem II proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana : is it caused by genetic variation in the STN kinases? Photophysiology of kleptoplasts: photosynthetic use of light by chloroplasts living in animal cells.

Photosynthesis under artificial light: the shift in primary and secondary metabolism. Multiple feedbacks between chloroplast and whole plant in the context of plant adaptation and acclimation to the environment. How does Europe PMC derive its citations network?

Protein Interactions. Protein Families. Nucleotide Sequences. Functional Genomics Experiments. Protein Structures. Gene Ontology GO Terms. Data Citations. Proteomics Data. Menu Formats. Full Text.

Clearly, this applies to AIP journals, not the bio journals. Google Scholar 4 Dudley, R. Qiu, Y. Email Required, but never shown. Nature , 41—42 Maxworthy, T. Dickinson, M.

Phil trans r soc lond b. Navigation menu

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By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy , Privacy Policy , and our Terms of Service. Academia Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for academics and those enrolled in higher education. It only takes a minute to sign up. I would like to cite journal articles published by the Royal Society , specifically in the journal Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences.

A prominent example is the Wikipedia page of the journal , citing amongst others:. Maxwell, J. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Hawking, S. Should I simply remove the of London resp.

Or is there any specific reason to include of London in some cases? I wrote to the Royal Society out of curiosity, and received a very helpful answer, along with the permission to post quotes from it here. The answer to the first part of your question is easy. As to the abbreviations, there is a huge variety of these and no single standard has been adopted across all publishers for any journal abbreviation system.

For example, "Royal" can be shortened to either R. Some use ISO4. Fortunately it no longer matters very much which abbreviation people use, as citations now use the DOI which carries all the relevant information. If a journal title undergoes minor changes that do not require a new bibliographic record, the existing title abbreviation continues to be used.

Once the title abbreviation has been assigned, NLM and the ISSN Centre do not go back and change a title abbreviation qualified by place name, even if the place of publication changes over time. So the conclusion is: someone who decides to use the National Library of Medcine Title Abbreviations consistently will abbreviate.

In bibliographies you should always use the standardized abbreviations for journal titles. It just gets confusing if everyone starts making up their own abbreviations. Edit: I usually use two ways to find the standard abbreviation: mathscinet's journal search and the journal's webpage.

Embarrassingly for my answer, in this case the two sources disagree, mathscinet subscriber link gives "Philos. London Ser. B" while the journal's webpage gives Phil.

So you're probably fine either way. Sign up to join this community. The best answers are voted up and rise to the top. Home Questions Tags Users Unanswered. Ask Question. Asked 1 year, 8 months ago. Active 1 year, 8 months ago. Viewed times. Example A prominent example is the Wikipedia page of the journal , citing amongst others: Maxwell, J. Question Should I simply remove the of London resp.

Royal Soc. This raises three sub-questions: Why do I see Royal abbreviated to R. Is it wrong? What is the correct way of including the series names such as B: Biological Sciences in the abbreviation? Was there another official abbreviation in the past, possibly including Lond. My American Institute of Physics style manual 4th edition, lists it as 'Philos. London' or 'Philos. London, Ser. A' for Series A. Clearly, this applies to AIP journals, not the bio journals.

But, check with your journal's style manual. So here is part 1, referring to Background in the question: The answer to the first part of your question is easy. And here is part 2, referring to the Question : As to the abbreviations, there is a huge variety of these and no single standard has been adopted across all publishers for any journal abbreviation system.

And I was even provided with some additional hints: Most science publishers use the National Library of Medicine formerly Index Medicus system.

Lastly, some relevant information could be found in the Fact Sheet: Construction of the National Library of Medicine Title Abbreviations : If a journal title undergoes minor changes that do not require a new bibliographic record, the existing title abbreviation continues to be used.

This seems to be the authoritative answer. Noah Snyder Noah Snyder How does one determine what the standardized abbreviation is? That's what the Harvard or APA standards for example help control isn't it? My impression from using mathscinet had been that their was a single clear standard for abbreviations.

It appears that I was wrong. Edited to reflect that. Some publishers have their own lists of journal abbreviations that they use.

This kind of thing is typically dealt with during the production process after a paper has been accepted. As long as the abbreviation you use is reasonable and can be recognized by reviewers and editors, you're probably fine. Sign up or log in Sign up using Google. Sign up using Facebook.

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